Morpht: Drupal 8 Configuration - Part 2: How the API works
Background We live in an age of Drupal complexity. In the early days of Drupal, many developers would have a single Drupal instance/environment (aka copy) that was their production site, where they would test out new modules and develop new functionality. Developing on the live website however sometimes met with disastrous consequences when things went wrong! Over time, technology on the web grew, and nowadays it's fairly standard to have a Drupal project running on multiple environments to allow site development to be run in parallel to a live website without causing disruptions. New functionality is developed first in isolated private copies of the website, put into a testing environment where it is approved by clients, and eventually merged into the live production site. While multiple environments allow for site development without causing disruptions on the live production website, it introduces a new problem; how to ensure consistency between site copies so that they are all working with the correct code. This series of articles will explore the Configuration API, how it enables functionality to be migrated between multiple environments (sites), and ways of using the Configuration API with contributed modules to effectively manage the configuration of a project. This series will consist of the following posts: Part 1: The Configuration API Part 2: How the API works Part...
Matt Glaman: A proper introduction to Drupal Check
A proper introduction to Drupal Check Sunday 12, May 2019 mglaman You may have heard of Drupal Check. You may wonder what in the world it is or how it even came to be. I realized this went from an internal research and development task for a product, to open source contribution and then to an essential tool in the march toward Drupal 9. The timeline from January to DrupalCon in April has been pretty crazy, and I realized I have never done a proper blog post about Drupal Check.
Matt Glaman: ContribKanban 2019 update
ContribKanban 2019 update Saturday 11, May 2019 mglaman It seems that I do a roughly annual update for ContribKanban and what I plan on doing with it. This year I evaluated its future and roadmap and how it can be more useful for the community at large.
Chapter Three: Gated resources forms with webform and token
On several occasions clients have come to us asking for a form with a gated resource. They want the  resource (.pdf, .doc, .xls etc.) to be available to download after the user fills a form. In exchange for the visitor's valuable information, we provide them a file. This is easily achievable in Drupal 8 with the Webform and Token modules.  At the time of creation of this blog post, I used Drupal version 8.7.0.
Vasily Yaremchuk: I have switched my Drupal 8 site to a static HTML site with Tome
I have switched my Drupal 8 site to a static HTML site with Tome Many years ago I made my personal page on Drupal 7, as soon as Drupal 8 was released I have upgraded to this version. My personal site is just a page with my contacts and my blog.  In truth, I do not always have enough time to write posts to my blog, as well as keep the core and modules up to date. Some times between the huge projects I have a frame to share my experience and to make some support tasks and improvements.  So more than 99% of its life my personal site works as a simple static HTML site. Does it make sense to use Drupal as a backend?  Let's imagine the site is static at any time except the time when I want to edit it... And it's possible with Tome. It's Drupal 8 module. You can get more information on the official site tome.fyi. Let me show you my personal site abzats.com. It's a static HTML site. I don't have the permanent version of this site either hosted somewhere or locally. But I have a private repository of my Drupal site with configurations and content in flat files.  Tome module allows exporting configurations in .yml files and content in .json files as well as install Drupal with those files without operating with the DataBase dump. I have decided to put some changes on the site. I need to get the site locally, log in Drupal admin, make changes and generate a new...
wishdesk.com: New Drupal Media Library interface: managing media with joy
The blend of usability and attractiveness exists — this is Media Library in Drupal 8.7 core. That’s what comes to mind when we see Drupal Media Library’s updated UI. Managing media on websites will now be easier and more enjoyable than before! Drupal Media Library allows you to:
Roy Scholten: No one-offs
Sub title Things seen here are configured there. /sites/default/files/styles/large/public/things-shown-here-configured-there.png?itok=qSZb6N0L An elaboration on underlying considerations that make simple suggestions as this one not so simple after all. An important consideration when deciding whether to “add something to core” is that generally speaking, core doesn’t do one-offs. The underlying principle is not “make it do X” but “make it possible to make it do X (and X2, X3,…) Linking from a create context to a configuration context In this particular case we have a proposal to link to the screen where you can add new content types from the page that lists available content types to create content with. Or, in url speak: on /node/add, put a link to /admin/structure/types. Or once more: on the screen that lists existing content types that you can create content with, add a link to the screen that lets you define new content types. Notice the distinction between “create content of type X” and “define a new type of content Y”. The first is a content creation task, the second is a content definition task (in Drupal jargon usually captured under “site building”). This distinction then should clarify why a link to define a new content type should not use the “blue + button” pattern on a screen that is in service of a...
Morpht: Drupal 8 Configuration - Part 1: The Configuration API
Background We live in an age of Drupal complexity. In the early days of Drupal, many developers would have a single Drupal instance/environment (aka copy) that was their production site, where they would test out new modules and develop new functionality. Developing on the live website however sometimes met with disastrous consequences when things went wrong! Over time, technology on the web grew, and nowadays it's fairly standard to have a Drupal project running on multiple environments to allow site development to be run in parallel to a live website without causing disruptions. New functionality is developed first in isolated private copies of the website, put into a testing environment where it is approved by clients, and eventually merged into the live production site. While multiple environments allow for site development without causing disruptions on the live production website, it introduces a new problem; how to ensure consistency between site copies so that they are all working with the correct code. This series of articles will explore the Configuration API, how it enables functionality to be migrated between multiple environments (sites), and ways of using the Configuration API with contributed modules to effectively manage the configuration of a project. This series will consist of the following posts: Part 1: The Configuration API Part 2: How the API works (...
DrupalCon News: Reflections from DrupalCon Seattle’s Grant & Scholarship Recipients
What an event this last DrupalCon was! Thanks to all who joined us in April for DrupalCon Seattle 2019.

In planning this event, more funds than ever before — 30 percent more, to be exact — were allocated for grants and scholarships. This tied in with the overall aim of having a cross-section of attendees, all of whom play a part in contributing and advancing the Drupal Project. Funding for grants and scholarships is from the support of our conference partners, as well as conference registrations.

Sven Decabooter: How to make a Drupal 8 local task title dynamic
How to make a Drupal 8 local task title dynamic When defining local tasks (= tabs) in your Drupal 8 modules, you can specify a title for the tab via the 'title' property in your [MODULENAME].links.task.yml file. However, in some cases you might want to make the task title dynamic, e.g. depending on the context of the entity where the tab is displayed.
This can be achieved by overriding the \Drupal\Core\Menu\LocalTaskDefault class with your own class for that tab. Here is an example that uses a callback function to dynamically set the title, both for the route and the local task:   Add the dynamic logic to your controller File: my_module/src/Controller/DynamicTabController.php <?php namespace Drupal\my_module\Controller; use Drupal\Core\Controller\ControllerBase; use Drupal\node\NodeInterface; /** * Controller for our dynamic tab. */ class DynamicTabController extends ControllerBase { /** * Route title callback. * * @param \Drupal\node\NodeInterface $node * The node entity. * * @return string * The title. */ public function getDynamicTabTitle(NodeInterface $node) { return $this->t('Dynamic tab for @type', ['@type' => $node->bundle()]); } } Use the dynamic title callback for your route File: my_module/my_module.routing.yml entity.node.dynamic_tab: path: '/node/{node}/dynamic_tab'...
Specbee: Drupal 8.7 Features (What’s New and Why Should You Care)
How do you stay ahead of your competition? Easy - Be relevant. Address your audience’s pain points. Repeat. With the adoption of the continuous innovation model, Drupal is doing that and more. Drupal 8.7 was released on May 1st following the 6 months release cycle for Drupal 8. We saw huge improvements in Drupal 8.6 which was a big release. With 8.7, it just got better - With more stable modules ready to be used on productions and other interesting out-of-the-box features.
ThinkShout: Recognizing Insecure Drupal Code
Within the Drupal community, it seems like many developers are interested in ensuring their modules and themes are secure, but don’t really know what insecure code looks like. I’ve personally found a lot of resources that tell you about security best practices, but don’t dive deeper into common missteps and their consequences. Drupal 8 is the most modern and secure release of Drupal yet, which leads developers to expect that all Drupal 8 APIs are perfectly safe to use. While it’s great that Drupal has earned that reputation, there are still plenty of ways to leave your site vulnerable. In this blog I’ll go through examples of insecure code that I’ve seen doing security research and review into Drupal 8, which will hopefully make it easier for you to know what to look for when reviewing your own code. So you want to render HTML… Outputting HTML is Drupal’s bread and butter, but if you’re rendering user input you may be vulnerable to cross site scripting, otherwise known as XSS. XSS occurs when a malicious user identifies an exploit that allows user input to be executed as Javascript. Then, typically, an attacker leads someone without higher privileges (an administrator) to trigger the exploit. At that point, an attacker can do anything the administrator can do - add more administrator accounts, delete content, download sensitive data, and potentially use a chained exploit...

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