Drudesk: A glimpse at Drupal 8 and Vue.js combination
The trend of using JavaScript frameworks with Drupal keeps gaining popularity. It is used for creating rich, fast, and interactive web interfaces. One of the hot use areas is decoupled (headless Drupal 8) architecture, with the front-end part completely entrusted to a JS framework. There are many JS frameworks and libraries that pair well with Drupal 8 — React, Angular, Gatsby, Ember, Elm etc. Today, we will review one of them — Vue.js. Let’s take a closer look at Drupal 8 and Vue.js combination.
Sooper Drupal Themes: Sooperthemes 2015-2018 Retrospective: Crafting Enterprise-Ready Solutions For A Better Drupal Experience
As of today Sooperthemes provides the only proven enterprise-grade drag and drop Drupal builder, and framework theme. Examples proving this point are sites being rolled out by the United Nations, Google, and by the US Senate for all newly inaugurated senators! 3 years ago, Sooperthemes started developing Drupal tools in a novel way: developing every tool as a platform. This resulted in our theme agnostic Glazed Builder drag and drop solution, and our  Glazed framework theming platform. Throughout the years, Sooperthemes has evolved to become much more than just a theme shop. While we still provide a gallery of premium Drupal designs that can be found on our website, we now focus our efforts towards developing solutions rather than tools that bring great value to all Drupal users, organizations, governments, and enthusiasts worldwide. At Sooperthemes we believe that building web content should be an easy and approachable process for anyone, even for people who aren't necessarily tech savvy. With this idea in mind we are headed on a mission: To empower Drupal users with the necessary capabilities to build high-end responsive websites as well as help experienced site builders and organizations work faster through development automation.  Sooperthemes today Our Glazed framework theme allows users to have control over every...
OPTASY: Easy Page Speed Audit: How to Improve the Perceived Performance of Your Drupal Site
Easy Page Speed Audit: How to Improve the Perceived Performance of Your Drupal Site radu.simileanu Thu, 02/14/2019 - 09:10 How do you run a page speed audit from a user experience standpoint? For, let's face it: website performance is user experience!  What are the easiest and most effective ways to measure your Drupal website's performance? What auditing tools should you be using? How do you identify the critical metrics to focus your audit on? And, once identified, how do you turn the collected data into speed optimization decisions? Into targeted performance improvement solutions... Also, how fast is “ideally fast”, in the context of your competition's highest scores and of your users' expectations? Here are the easiest steps of an effective page performance audit, with a focus on the prompt actions you could take for improving it.
 
Dries Buytaert: Optimizing site performance by reducing JavaScript and CSS
I've been thinking about the performance of my site and how it affects the user experience. There are real, ethical concerns to poor web performance. These include accessibility, inclusion, waste and environmental concerns. A faster site is more accessible, and therefore more inclusive for people visiting from a mobile device, or from areas in the world with slow or expensive internet. For those reasons, I decided to see if I could improve the performance of my site. I used the excellent https://webpagetest.org to benchmark a simple blog post https://dri.es/relentlessly-eliminating-barriers-to-growth. The image above shows that to render that page, it took a browser 0.722 seconds to download and render the page (see blue vertical line): The first 210 milliseconds are used to set up the connection, which includes the DNS lookup, TCP handshake and the SSL negotiation. The next 260 milliseconds (from 0.21 seconds to 0.47 seconds) are spent downloading one HTML file, two CSS files and one JavaScript file. After everything is downloaded, the final 330 milliseconds (from 0.475 seconds to 0.8 seconds) are used to layout the page, execute the JavaScript code and download the Favicon. By most standards, 0.722 seconds is pretty fast. In fact, according to HTTP Archive, it takes more than 2.4 seconds to download and render the average web page on a desktop. Regardless, I...
Optimizing site performance by reducing JavaScript and CSS
I've been thinking about the performance of my site and how it affects the user experience. There are real, ethical concerns to poor web performance. These include accessibility, inclusion, waste and environmental concerns. A faster site is more accessible, and therefore more inclusive for people visiting from a mobile device, or from areas in the world with slow or expensive internet. For those reasons, I decided to see if I could improve the performance of my site. I used the excellent https://webpagetest.org to benchmark a simple blog post https://dri.es/relentlessly-eliminating-barriers-to-growth. The image above shows that it took a browser 0.722 seconds to download and render the page (see blue vertical line): The first 210 milliseconds are used to set up the connection, which includes the DNS lookup, TCP handshake and the SSL negotiation. The next 260 milliseconds (from 0.21 seconds to 0.47 seconds) are spent downloading the rendered HTML file, two CSS files and one JavaScript file. After everything is downloaded, the final 330 milliseconds (from 0.475 seconds to 0.8 seconds) are used to layout the page and execute the JavaScript code. By most standards, 0.722 seconds is pretty fast. In fact, according to HTTP Archive, it takes more than 2.4 seconds to download and render the average web page on a laptop or desktop computer. Regardless, I noticed that the...
Drupal blog: Headless CMS: REST vs JSON:API vs GraphQL
This blog has been re-posted and edited with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. The web used to be server-centric in that web content management systems managed data and turned it into HTML responses. With the rise of headless architectures a portion of the web is becoming server-centric for data but client-centric for its presentation; increasingly, data is rendered into HTML in the browser. This shift of responsibility has given rise to JavaScript frameworks, while on the server side, it has resulted in the development of JSON:API and GraphQL to better serve these JavaScript applications with content and data. In this blog post, we will compare REST, JSON:API and GraphQL. First, we'll look at an architectural, CMS-agnostic comparison, followed by evaluating some Drupal-specific implementation details. It's worth noting that there are of course lots of intricacies and "it depends" when comparing these three approaches. When we discuss REST, we mean the "typical REST API" as opposed to one that is extremely well-designed or following a specification (not REST as a concept). When we discuss JSON:API, we're referring to implementations of the JSON:API specification. Finally, when we discuss GraphQL, we're referring to GraphQL as it used in practice. Formally, it is only a query language, not a standard for building APIs. The architectural comparison should be useful for...
Lullabot: Introducing the Quicklink module for Drupal
The mobile web is too slow. According to the HTTP Archive, the median time to first contentful paint is 5.8 seconds — this means that the average person waits almost 6 seconds just to view an average website on their phone. 
Blair Wadman: Easy way to find the Drush command you are looking for
Both Drush and Console have built-in help. If you type drush, you will get a long list of available commands. If you type drupal, again you will get a long list of available console commands. If you can’t remember the exact command to use to do what you need, you can scroll through the long list of commands to find the one you want.
Drupal Association blog: Keeping up to date with information for Drupal Event Organizers
The events that every year bring us together all over the World are the lifeblood of our vibrant and diverse community. From BADCamp in California, USA, through Global Training Days in Omsk, Russia to Contribution Weekends in Leeds, UK, we have a combined wealth of knowledge and experiences but also challenges and opportunities. At the Drupal Association, we value highly the commitment made by those who volunteer their time to make these events happen. If I wasn’t British, and therefore terribly understated, at this point I would probably say “You rock!”. As an event organiser, I wanted to take the opportunity to bring to your attention a few things happening in the community that we hope will help you in your efforts. The Event Organizers’ Group We were very pleased to see the creation of a growing group of event organizers forming and beginning to have regular meetings to share experiences and resources. One of its founders, Kaleem Clarkson, has blogged about this and their plans for the future. To help with their formation, we helped them become one of the first groups to create one of the new Community Group Sections at Drupal.org/community/event-organizers. One thing that is super important, though, is that this group has representation by event organizers from all around the World. Wherever you live, do join this group, make your voice heard and ensure that it meets in a...
Acquia Developer Center Blog: Building Usable Conversations: Conversational Usability Testing
In this fifth installment of our series on conversational usability, our focus shifts to conversational usability and the process of evaluating and improving conversational interfaces that often differ significantly from the visual and physical interfaces we normally use to test with end users. Tags: acquia drupal planet
InternetDevels: Updated and stable Webform module in Drupal 8 for form creation
Various forms are the heart of website’s interaction with the user. They are vital for usability, conversions, marketing analytics, and more. So form building tools are in demand — the Drupal Webform module ranks 7th on the 42,000+ list of contributed modules. The Webform module has recently got its stable version for Drupal 8. We will give it an overview and show an example of creating a simple form with the Webform module. Read more
Flocon de toile | Freelance Drupal: Provide a footer to a micro site with Drupal 8
The Micro Site module allows you to set up a Drupal web factory, from a single Drupal 8 instance, to power a multitude of sites, of a different nature if necessary. Micro Site provides a new content entity that allows you to customize these different site types at will, using the APIs available on Drupal 8, and modify their behavior according to business needs.

Total Twitter Followers
Tweets Impressions Monthly
Facebook Followers
Total YouTube Views

29,2K
194,7K
1,420
382,9K

Alexa Global Rank
Alexa Rank in United States
Unique Visitors Last 28 Days
Pageviews Last 28 Days

359,1K
333,1K
23,283
69,066

External Backlinks
Keywords Tracked
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Updated

11,837
4,082
21,345
22 Mar 2019