Do Businesses Really Use Google My Business Posts? A Case Study
Posted by Ben_FisherGoogle My Business (GMB) is one of the most powerful ways to improve a business’ local search engine optimization and online visibility. If you’re a local business, claiming your Google My Business profile is one of the first steps you should take to increase your company’s online presence.
As long as your local business meets Google’s guidelines, your Google My Business profile can help give your company FREE exposure on Google’s search engine. Not only can potential customers quickly see your business’ name, address and phone number, but they can also see photos of your business, read online reviews, find a description about your company, complete a transaction (like book an appointment) and see other information that grabs a searcher’s attention — all without them even visiting your website. That’s pretty powerful stuff!

Google My Business helps with local rankingsNot only is your GMB Profile easily visible to potential customers when they search on Google, but Google My Business is also a key Google local ranking factor. In fact, according to local ranking factor industry research, Google My Business “signals” is the most important ranking factor for local pack rankings. Google My Business signals had a significant increase in ranking importance between 2017 and 2018 — rising from 19% to 25%.

Claiming your Google My Business profile is your first step to local optimization — but many people mistakenly think that just claiming your Google My Business profile is enough. However, optimizing your Google My Business profile and frequently logging into your Google My Business dashboard to make sure that no unwanted updates have been made to your profile is vital to improving your rankings and ensuring the integrity of your business profile’s accuracy.
Google My Business features that make your profile ROCK!Google offers a variety of ways to optimize and enhance your Google My Business profile. You can add photos, videos, business hours, a description of your company, frequently asked questions and answers, communicate with customers via messages, allow customers to book appointments, respond to online reviews and more.
One of the most powerful ways to grab a searcher’s attention is by creating Google My Business Posts. GMB Posts are almost like mini-ads for your company, products, or services.
Google offers a variety of posts you can...
How to Identify and Tackle Keyword Cannibalization in 2019
Posted by SamuelMangialavoriIf you read the title of this blog and somehow, even only for a second, thought about the iconic movie “The Silence of the Lambs”, welcome to the club — you are not alone!
Despite the fact that the term “cannibalization” does not sound very suitable for digital marketing, this core concept has been around for a long time. This term simply identifies the issue of having multiple pages competing for the same (or very similar) keywords/keyword clusters, hence the cannibalization.
What do we mean by cannibalization in SEO?This unfortunate and often unnoticed problem harms the SEO potential of the pages involved. When more than one page has the same/similar keyword target, it creates “confusion” in the eyes of the search engine, resulting in a struggle to decide what page to rank for what term.
For instance, say my imaginary e-commerce website sells shoes online and I have created a dedicated category page that targets the term ‘ankle boots’: www.distilledshoes.com/boots/ankle-boots/

Knowing the importance of editorial content, over time I decide to create two blog posts that cover topics related to ankle boots off the back of a keyword research: one post on how to wear ankle boots and another about the top 10 ways to wear ankle boots in 2019:


One month later, I realize that some of my blog pages are actually ranking for a few key terms that my e-commerce category page was initially visible for.
Now the question is: is this good or bad for my website?
Drum roll, please...and the answer is — It depends on the situation, the exact keywords, and the intent of the user when searching for a particular term.
Keyword cannibalization is not black or white — there are multiple grey areas and we will try and go though several scenarios in this blog post. I recommend you spend 5 minutes checking this awesome Whiteboard Friday which covers the topic of search intent extremely well.
How serious of a problem is keyword cannibalization?Much more than what you might think — almost every website that I have worked on in the past few years have some degree of cannibalization that needs resolving. It is hard to estimate how much a single page might be held back by this issue, as it involves a group of pages whose potential is being limited. So, my suggestion is to treat this issue by analyzing clusters of pages that have some degree of...
People Ask Their Most Pressing SEO Questions — Our Experts Answer
Posted by TheMozTeamWe teamed up with our friends at Duda, a website design scaling platform service, who asked their agency customers to divulge their most pressing SEO questions, quandaries, and concerns. Our in-house SEO experts, always down for a challenge, hunkered down to collaborate on providing them with answers. From Schema.org to voice search to local targeting, we're tackling real-world questions about organic search. Read on for digestible insights and further resources!How do you optimize for international markets?International sites can be multi-regional, multilingual, or both. The website setup will differ depending on that classification. Multi-regional sites are those that target audiences from multiple countries. For example: a site that targets users in the U.S. and the U.K.Multilingual sites are those that target speakers of multiple languages. For example, a site that targets both English and Spanish-speakers.To geo-target sections of your site to different countries, you can use a country-specific domain (ccTLD) such as “.de” for Germany or subdomains/subdirectories on generic TLDs such as “example.com/de.” For different language versions of your content, Google recommends using different URLs rather than using cookies to change the language of the content on the page. If you do this, make use of the hreflang tag to tell Google about alternate language versions of the page. For more information on internationalization, visit Google’s “Managing multi-regional and multilingual sites” or Moz’s guide to international SEO.How do we communicate to clients that SEO projects need ongoing maintenance work?If your client is having difficulty understanding SEO as a continuous effort, rather than a one-and-done task, it can be helpful to highlight the changing nature of the web. Say you created enough quality content and earned enough links to that content to earn yourself a spot at the top of page one. Because organic placement is earned and not paid for, you don’t have to keep paying to maintain that placement on page one. However, what happens when a competitor comes along with better content that has more links than your content? Because Google wants to surface the highest quality content, your page’s rankings will likely suffer in favor of this better page. Maybe it’s not a competitor that depreciates your site’s rankings. Maybe new...
Communicating to Clients & Stakeholders in a Constantly Changing SEO Landscape
Posted by KameronJenkinsWhen your target is constantly moving, how can you keep your clients informed and happy?Raise your hand if you’ve ever struggled to keep up with all the changes in our industry.
Go ahead, don’t be shy!
Even the most vigilant SEOs have been caught off guard by an algorithm update, changes to the SERP layout, or improvements to the tools we rely on.
It can be tiring trying to keep up with a constantly moving target, but it doesn’t even stop there. SEOs must also explain those developments to their clients and stakeholders.
Work at an agency? Your clients will want to know that you’re helping them stay relevant. During my agency years, I can’t tell you how many times clients emailed in with a link to an article on the topic of a new development asking, “Do we need to be worried about this? How can we use this for our SEO?” Keeping apprised of these changes and informing your client how it applies to them is a critical component of not just campaign success, but customer loyalty.
Work in-house? The main difference here is that your client is your boss. Whereas at an agency you might lose a client over communication lapses, in-house SEOs could lose their jobs. That’s obviously the worst-case scenario, but if you’re in a budget-conscious, SEO-immature company, failing to stay relevant and communicate those changes effectively could mean your boss stops seeing the value in your position.
Anticipating changes and mitigating anxiety There are some changes we know about ahead of time.
For example, when Google announced the mobile friendly update (remember #mobilegeddon?), they did so two months ahead of the actual rollout, and they had also been encouraging the use of mobile-friendly design long before that.
Google announced HTTPS as a ranking signal back in 2014 and had been advocating for a secure web long before that, but they didn’t start adding the “not secure” warning to all non-HTTPS pages in Chrome until July 2018.
Big changes usually warrant big announcements ahead of the rollout. You need time to prepare for changes like this and to use that time to prepare your clients and stakeholders as well. It’s why Moz put so much effort into educational materials around the rollout of the new DA.
But in order to mitigate the anxiety these changes can cause, we have to know about them. So where can we go to stay up-to-date?
If you’ve been in...
Introducing: The SEO Marketing Hub, A Free Library of SEO Resources

I’m SUPER excited to announce the release of the SEO Marketing Hub.
This free resource library covers over 35 key topics — including Schema, sitemaps, SEO software, content audits, link bait, rich snippets, and lots more.
You can check out the brand new SEO Marketing Hub right here:

Visit The SEO Marketing Hub
All in all, this resource library contains over 50,000 words, 700 screenshots, as well as 150+ custom-designed diagrams, charts and visuals.


Needless to say, this is the biggest content project my team and I have ever worked on.
I’m really happy with how The SEO Marketing Hub turned out.
And I hope you get a ton of value from it.
Check out the SEO Marketing Hub.
Here’s The Full Breakdown
The SEO Marketing Hub is broken down into 7 core topics:

SEO Fundamentals – Here’s where you catch up on the basics of search engine optimization. You’ll learn what SEO is, how it works, strategies for finding keywords, tips for SEO-friendly web development, and more.
Content Optimization Strategies – Learn exactly how to optimize your site’s content in 2019. You’ll also see how to take advantage of “SERP Features”, like Rich Snippets.
Technical SEO – Sitemaps. Crawl Budget. Website Architecture. They’re all important for making sure that Google can crawl and index your entire site. And in this section you’ll learn how to improve your site’s technical SEO.
Link Building Techniques – Here’s where you’ll learn how to build links to your site using white hat link building techniques like Broken Link Building, evergreen content, original research, and more.
User Experience Signals – Learn how to optimize your content for “UX Signals”, like bounce rate, dwell time, searcher intent and organic CTR.
SEO Tools and Software – Here’s where you’ll learn how to make your SEO campaigns more effective using popular SEO software platforms like Ahrefs, Moz Pro and SEMrush.
Advanced SEO Strategies – Learn how to take your SEO skills to the next level. You’ll see how to build an SEO team, do a content audit, and measure results like a pro.

Visit The SEO Marketing Hub
What Do You Think?
I’d love to hear what you think about the new SEO Marketing Hub.
Specifically, I’d like to know:
What’s the #1 thing you want to learn about SEO right now...

Professional Website Audit 

Check website seo score and visibility, coding issues, social media presence with the best and most trusted internet websites ranking companies.

$180 Monthly

Daily One Website

Total Twitter Followers
Tweets Impressions Monthly
Facebook Followers
Pinterest Followers

32,6K
143,6K
1,392
2,073

YouTube Subscribers
Total YouTube Views
Instagram Followers
LinkedIn Followers

193
383,3K
22
84

Alexa Global Rank
Alexa Rank in US
Keywords Analyzed
Updated

554,8K
174,9K
21,345
20 Apr 2019