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6 Local Search Marketing DIY Tips for the Crafting Industry
Posted by MiriamEllisThink crafting is kids’ stuff? Think again. The owners of quilting, yarn, bead, fabric, woodworking, art supply, stationers, edible arts, and related shops know that:
The crafting industry generated $44 billion in 2016 in the US alone.63% of American households engage in at least one crafting project annually, while more than one in four participate in 5+ per year.The top three craft store chains in the country (Michaels, JOANN, Hobby Lobby) operate nearly 3,000 locations, just among themselves.There are an estimated 3,200 US storefronts devoted to quilting alone. Thousands more vend everything from the stuff of ancient arts (knitting, with a 1,000-year history) to the trendy and new (unicorn slime, which, yes, is really a thing).
Our local search marketing industry has devoted abundant time to advising major local business categories over the past couple of decades, but crafting is one substantial retail niche we may have overlooked. I’d like to rectify this today.
I feel personally inspired by craft store owners. Over the years, I’ve learned to sew, quilt, embroider, crochet, knit, and bead, and before I became a local search marketer, I was a working fine artist. I even drafted a sewing pattern once that was featured in a crafting magazine. Through my own exploration of arts and crafts, I’ve come to know so many independent business owners in this industry, and have marketed several of them. These are gutsy people who take risks, work extremely hard for their living, and often zestfully embrace any education they can access about marketing.
Today, I’m offering my six best marketing tips for craft retailers for a more successful and profitable 2020.
First, a quick definition of local search marketing
Your store is your location. Your market is made up of all of your customers’ locations. Anything you do to promote your location to the market you serve is considered local search marketing. Your market could be your neighborhood, your city, or a larger local region. Local search marketing can include both offline efforts, like hanging eye-catching signage or getting mentioned in local print news, and online efforts, like having a website, building listings on local business listing platforms, and managing customer reviews.
Whatever you do to increase local awareness about your location, interact online with customers, bring them...
Spectator to Partner: Turn Your Clients into SEO Allies - Best of Whiteboard Friday
Posted by KameronJenkinsAre your clients your allies in SEO, or are they passive spectators? Could they even be inadvertently working against you? A better understanding of expectations, goals, and strategy by everyone involved can improve your client relations, provide extra clarity, and reduce the number of times you're asked to "just SEO a site." 
In today's Whiteboard Friday, Kameron Jenkins outlines tactics you should know for getting clients and bosses excited about the SEO journey, as well as the risks involved in passivity.
(We were inspired to revisit this classic Whiteboard Friday by our brand-new Mini Guide to SEO Reporting! These two resources go together like a fine La Croix and a well-aged cheese.)
Hop to the Mini Guide









Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription
Hey, everyone, and welcome to this week's edition of Whiteboard Friday. I am Kameron Jenkins, and I'm the SEO Wordsmith here at Moz. Today I'm going to be talking with you about how to turn your clients from spectators, passive spectators to someone who is proactively interested and an ally in your SEO journey.

So if you've ever heard someone come to you, maybe it's a client or maybe you're in-house and this is your boss saying this, and they say, "Just SEO my site," then this is definitely for you. A lot of times it can be really hard as an SEO to work on a site if you really aren't familiar with the business, what that client is doing, what they're all about, what their goals are. So I'm going to share with you some tactics for getting your clients and your boss excited about SEO and excited about the work that you're doing and some risks that can happen when you don't do that.

Tactics
So let's dive right in. All right, first we're going to talk about tactics.

1. Share news
The first tactic is to share news. In the SEO industry, things are changing all the time, so it's actually a really great tactic to keep yourself informed, but also to share that news with the client. So here's an example. Google My Business is now experimenting with a new video format for their post feature. So one thing that you can do is say, "Hey, client, I hear that Google is experimenting with this new format. They're using videos now. Would you like to try it?"

So that's really cool because it shows them that you're on top of...
Using SEO Forecasting: How to Build an SEO Business Case


When SEOs ask for the investment expenditure for organic search, they have to prove the value of the initiative upfront – the same as asking for an investment in paid advertising. The difference, however, is that results from SEO are unpredictable.
‘Tis the Season for Reporting (And a New Mini Guide)
Posted by Roger-MozBotHow is it already reporting season again? Time to generate those dreaded end-of-year SEO reports that take hours to create and mere seconds for your client to skim through and toss to the side. We’ve all been there. But here's the thing: it’s absolutely necessary! Not only for you and your team to track progress, but to prove value to your clients as well.
Reporting for SEO can feel like a time-black-hole. You have an infinite amount of data that you have to sort through and piece together to tell a story. You know that you saw something, somewhere at some point that proved a strategy worked, but of course, now that you need it you can’t find it and now you’ve been looking for it for an hour and you just want to get back to the SEO part of your job.
What if we told you we could help you create reports that matter to your team and your clients in less time with better output? Today we launched our newest brainchild, the Mini Guide to SEO Reporting, our free guide to help you create the most effective SEO reports for your business.
Give it a read!
Okay, so maybe it's not the MOST mini mini-guide that ever did mini. But in comparison to the Beginner's Guide to SEO, it's definitely a munchkin! We like to think it's chock full of easy-to-read chapters and plenty of actionable-insights, a few of which we’d like to share with you now.
1. More data, more problems
The idea for the mini guide was born after we noticed a trend in SEO reporting — they're often cobbled together and extremely time intensive. Many SEOs rely on multiple platforms to gather all of the data needed to make recommendations and track progress. So, when they want to report back to their clients, they have to go to all of the different platforms to collect the necessary data. This makes everything ten times more complicated because many of the platforms use differing jargon and have different data exporting processes, and when it comes time to piece it all together, it’s extremely difficult to maintain a consistent tone or a clear story to follow.
That leads us right into the first actionable insight: your reports need to be KonMaried. Well, kind of. In reporting, you can’t quite ask if a data point brings you joy, but you can ask if a data point is meaningful. You need to ask yourself, your team, and most importantly your client which data points are meaningful to...
State of the Enterprise SEO Industry


It’s no understatement to say that the SEO industry changes at an unbelievable pace. 
New Product From seoClarity: Clickstream Insights


Any major enterprise brand serious about its online search presence faces an enormous challenge: it typically has to work with limited or incomplete search data. 
Becoming an Industry Thought Leader: Advanced Techniques for Finding the Best Places to Pitch Guest Posts
Posted by KristinTynskiIf you’re involved in any kind of digital PR — or pitching content to writers to expand your brand awareness and build strong links — then you know how hard it can be to find a good home for your content.
I’m about to share the process you can use to identify the best, highest ROI publishers for building consistent, mutually beneficial guest posting relationships with.
This knowledge has been invaluable in understanding which publications have the best reach and authority to other known vertical/niche experts, allowing you to share your own authority within these readership communities.
Before we get started, there’s a caveat: If you aren’t willing to develop true thought leadership, this process won’t work for you. The prerequisite for success here is having a piece of content that is new, newsworthy, and most likely data-driven.
Now let’s get to the good stuff.
Not all publications are equal
Guest posting can increase awareness of your brand, create link authority, and ultimately generate qualified leads. However, that only happens if you pick publishers that have:
The trust of your target audience.Topical relevance and authority.Sufficiently large penetration in readership amongst existing authorities in your niche/vertical.
A big trap many fall into is not properly prioritizing their guest posting strategy along these three important metrics.
To put this strategy into context, I’ll provide a detailed methodology for understanding the “thought leadership” space of two different verticals. I’ll also include actionable tips for developing a prioritized list of targets for winning guest spots or columns with your killer content.
It all starts with BuzzSumo
We use BuzzSumo data as the starting point for developing these interactive elements. For this piece, the focus will be on looking at data pulled from their Influencer and Shared Links APIs.
Let’s begin by looking at the data we’re after in the regular user interface. On the Influencers tab, we start by selecting a keyword most representative of the overall niche/industry/vertical we want to understand. We’ll start with “SEO.”

The list of influencers here should already be sorted, but feel free to narrow it down by applying filters. I recommend making sure your final list has 250-500 influencers as a minimum to be comprehensive.
Next, and most importantly, we want to get the...
The Local Algorithm: Relevance, Proximity, and Prominence
Posted by MaryBowlingHow does Google decide what goes into the local pack? It doesn't have to be a black box — there's logic behind the order. In this week's Whiteboard Friday, renowned local SEO expert Mary Bowling lays out the three factors that drive Google's local algorithm and local rankings in a simple and concise way anyone can understand.







Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription
Hi, Moz fans. This is Mary Bowling from Ignitor Digital, and today I want to talk to you about the local algorithm. I'd like to make this as simple as possible for people to understand, because I think it's a very confusing thing for a lot of SEOs who don't do this every day.
The local algorithm has always been based on relevance, prominence, and proximity. 
1. Relevance
For relevance, what the algorithm is asking is, "Does this business do or sell or have the attributes that the searcher is looking for?" That's pretty simple. So that gives us all these businesses over here that might be relevant. For prominence, the algorithm is asking, "Which businesses are the most popular and the most well regarded in their local market area?"
2. Proximity
For proximity, the question really is, "Is the business close enough to the searcher to be considered to be a good answer for this query?" This is what trips people up. This is what really defines the local algorithm — proximity. So I'm going to try to explain that in very simple terms here today.
Let's say we have a searcher in a particular location, and she's really hungry today and she wants some egg rolls. So her query is egg rolls. If she were to ask for egg rolls near me, these businesses are the ones that the algorithm would favor.
3. Prominence
They are the closest to her, and Google would rank them most likely by their prominence. If she were to ask for something in a particular place, let's say this is a downtown area and she asked for egg rolls downtown because she didn't want to be away from work too long, then the algorithm is actually going to favor the businesses that sell egg rolls in the downtown area even though that's further away from where the searcher is.
If she were to ask for egg rolls open now, there might be a business here and a business here and a business here that are open now, and they would be the ones that the algorithm...
12 Biggest seoClarity Innovations of 2019


Every year, we look back at what we’ve accomplished in the last twelve months, and I have to admit that each time we do this, I’m overwhelmed with pride and joy.

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